How harmful is added sugar?
How harmful is added sugar?
One of the biggest dangers of heart disease is too much added sugar. Sugars added during food processing (like sucrose or dextrose), foods packaged as sweeteners (like table sugar), sugars from syrups and honey, and sugars from concentrated fruit or vegetable juices are all examples of added sugars.
Did you know? HOW HARMFUL IS ADDED SUGAR? Human body doesn’t need any carbohydrates from added Human body doesn’t need any carbohydrates from added sugar. sugar. Most foods and beverages contain naturally occurring sugars, but added sugar is any sweetener that is added to foods or beverages during preparation or processing. Common added sugars include: 1. Agave 2. Cane sugar 3. Raw sugar and turbinado sugar 3. Corn syrup (High fructose corn syrup) 4. Honey 5. Maple syrup and cane juice Soft drinks, fruit drinks, flavoured yogurt, cereals, cookies, cakes, candy, and the majority of processed foods are the main sources. But minor items like soups, bread, cured meats, and ketchup also contain added sugar as a sweetener. Effect on human health Too much added sugar may puts at higher risk for: Cardiovascular disease Cognitive problems, including dementia and Alzheimer’s Colon cancer Diabetes High blood pressure, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels Kidney disease Liver disease Obesity and Inflammation Pancreatic cancer Retina, muscle, and nerve damage Oral cavities The liver converts dietary carbohydrates to fat in the same way that it does alcohol, which can result in a greater accumulation of fat that can eventually lead to fatty liver disease, a factor in diabetes, which increases the risk of heart disease. RDA for sugar: Max. 30 gm/day (Source: ICMR) How to limit sugar in the diet? Added sugars shouldn't account for more than 5% of the daily energy obtained from food and drink. For people over the age of 11, that equates to 30g per day. 1. Read nutrition labels: Total sugar, which includes added sugar, is often listed in grams. Note the number of grams of sugar per serving as well as the total number of servings 2. Limit consumption of Processed food: Keep track of the amount of processed food consumed and choose the one with lowest added sugar. 3. Cut the serving back: Keep note of those extra cubes of sugar being added to the cup of tea or coffee. 4. Swap: Try swapping processed fruit juices or sodas to complete fruit whenever possible.
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